Rules of Conduct

Rules of Conduct: PlymouthSpirit

PlymouthSpirit welcomes individuals of all religious and spiritual orientations – all are invited to engage in conversations on our online forum. When you participate in PlymouthSpirit discussions, you may encounter persons whose beliefs differ from your own. We ask that you approach these encounters in a spirit of tolerance, accepting the rights of others to freely express and follow their own religious beliefs.

We will not censor members for expressing an opinion, within the limits of these Rules of Conduct. To maintain a welcoming and safe community, and be sure everyone feels free to speak, we cannot permit behavior that disrupts conversations and community of our members. Plymouth Congregational Church has the right, but not the obligation, to remove or move any member-generated content for any reason, without notice.

The Rules of Conduct below apply to public community areas of PlymouthSpirit, such as message boards, public media, etc.

Courtesy: You agree that you will be courteous to others, even when disagreeing, and even to those whose beliefs you think are false or objectionable. When debating, express your opinion about a person’s ideas, not about the person. Do not make negative remarks about another’s age, disability, gender, ethnicity, race, nationality, sexual orientation, intelligence, character, appearance, health, mental health, education or any other personal characteristic.

Disruptive behavior: You agree not to disrupt or interfere with discussions, forums, or other community functions.

Proselytizing: You agree not to make aggressive, repeated, or unwanted attempts to convert another member’s religious beliefs.

Solicitation: You agree not to use PlymouthSpirit to promote websites, products and services.

You agree not to repeat substantially the same content (including URLs) more than once on PlymouthSpirit.

Copying messages: You agree not to post or forward transcripts of e-mail or other personal communication without the author’s express permission.

Use of code: You agree not to upload or link to any other code, tags, scripts, animations, file or program. You agree not to post content that is visually disruptive.

Your contact information: You agree to provide a valid e-mail address in your PlymouthSpirit communication.

Impersonation: You agree not to impersonate or spoof PlymouthSpirit members, employees, hosts, volunteers, revered religious figures or public figures.

Complaints: If there are problems, we want to know about them so that we can fix them. Please report complaints and problems appropriately. Do not post complaints on the site; they will be removed. The only appropriate way to report complaints and problems is to use the “report a problem” link at left.

In addition:

  • These Rules of Conduct apply to anything on PlymouthSpirit, including posts, screen names, member profiles, discussion titles, or any other text or images.
  • We have the right to suspend or terminate your participation for violation of the above rules.
  • We may seek your permission to re-use any member-created content (along with the username of the PlymouthSpirit member who posted it) somewhere else on the site or in any other medium (such as in a Plymouth Congregational publication).
  • Caution: We have made every effort to keep this site from being searchable by Google and other search engines, but we cannot offer a 100% guarantee posts are not exposed to these products.  Therefore, because PlymouthSpirit is quasi-public, and may be indexed by Google and other search engines, we advise members against revealing any personal information. If you choose to display your e-mail address, name, telephone number or location to other members, please be aware that Plymouth Congregational Church has no control over who uses your information or for what purpose. If you believe you are the target of a cyber-stalker, please refer to http://www.wiredpatrol.org/stalking for more information.
  • We neither endorse nor are responsible for any opinion, advice, information or statement made or displayed in this forum by third parties, nor are we responsible for any errors or omissions in such postings, or for hyperlinks embedded in messages. Under no circumstances will we be liable for any loss or damage caused by your reliance on information obtained in this forum. The opinions expressed in this forum are solely the opinions of the participants, and do not necessarily reflect the opinions of Plymouth Congregational Church.
  • Please check these guidelines periodically as they may be revised for the protection of our valued members. If you come across any violations to this covenant, do not hesitate to let us know. We’ll be happy to address your concerns. Please check these guidelines periodically as they may be revised for the protection of our valued members.

Rules of Conduct: Site-Wide

By registering as a member of PlymouthSpirit, you agree that you will not display content, or engage in any activity, that:

  1. is illegal, or advocates illegal acts;
  2. exploits or endangers a minor, or invites private communication between a minor and an adult [online safety tips for teens];
  3. compromises anyone’s privacy by using or revealing personal information;
  4. condones or may provoke violence toward any individual or group on the basis of age, disability, gender, ethnicity, race, nationality, religion, or sexual orientation, even if religiously motivated [learn more];
  5. is vulgar or violent;
  6. uses PlymouthSpirit community functions to harass or censure any person, group, or entity;
  7. violates intellectual property rights; or
  8. may cause or encourage substantial harm or damage to PlymouthSpirit or its members.

Furthermore you agree that you will not permit anyone else to display such words or images, or engage in such activity, on any PlymouthSpirit pages you control (your profile, journal, private messages, group pages, etc.).

The above rules apply to your activity and content anywhere on the PlymouthSpirit website, including articles, forums, profiles, journals, groups, photos, videos, audio, etc.

You may NOT use PlymouthSpirit Community functions, including private messages, to ask for money for yourself or any individual.

You may NOT use PlymouthSpirit to promote websites, products or services.

Please use restraint when sending messages to other members containing promotions. Most members resent such messages, and if PlymouthSpirit receives complaints we will take appropriate action.

If you come across any violations to this covenant, do not hesitate to let us know at jrabbers@comcast.net. We’ll be happy to address your concerns.

Note:  Do not enter your comments about the scripture reading on this page.  Please return to the Home Page

4 Responses to Rules of Conduct

  1. Ursa Zimmer says:

    I have memories of when I hiked, camped and skied in the Rocky Mountains (“years ago”). In some ways, I have never felt “higher” above the earth than after I had hiked to a summit or the top of a pass-seemingly higher than in an airplane. Perhaps because I was gasping to offset the lesser oxygen, or I still retained some sense of body to ground (albeit very, very small to very, very large, though I saw it), which is evolutionarily attenuated in an airplane at 30,000 feet. At the edge of a cliff, or driving along a switchback going over a pass, with what seemed like a pretty flimsy guardrail between me, my car and a drop of maybe a couple of thousand feet, vertiginous, tightening of hands on the wheel, and fear. Mountains take lung emptying, leg weakening, “why am I doing this” effort to climb-at least in my experience. When I am aware of my vague definitions of “God” I feel analogous sensations and quail. This may be related to why many cultures have projected “Gods” onto mountains. Yet, the view is beautiful, awe arousing, and seen with my two little eyes.
    +1

  2. Dee Halberg says:

    One of the characters, in the story, whom we too often overlook is Pharaoh’s daughter. Her supreme ruler father had insisted all Hebrew males below 3 be killed and she defied the rule and not only saved the child but brought the mother to nurse him. Yea for her bravery. Dee

  3. Hazel Lutz says:

    I want to clarify two things in relation to my experience of living at a much lower standard of living for a number of years in India.

    1. The experience of lowering my standard of living with regard to material possessions and comforts was successful in that I became comfortabel with it eventually, but it did involve a learning process. My upbringing had trained me to expect a certain level of comfort, and grown my body’s muscles and bones to fit certain types of furniture, etc. The point is that what I considered a basic minimum comfort level and standard of living is something developed from habit and training. It’s not something that is natural. If one is trained to a high standard of comfort, there is a lot of pain and suffering in learning to live closer to the ground. My first year in India was very painful. But I did achieve a high comfort level eventually.

    2. I said earlier that I believe that poverty/wealth is about relationships between individual people; it’s less about the material things themselves. I say this in the context of what my conception of God is. For me God is the space and time within which individual humans discuss and negotiate our individual relationships to each other and to the whole that is humanity, and the whole that is the universe. God stands in for the whole that is humanity–a whole that as individuals we are always struggling to become aware of within our limited, finite, separated parts of that whole. God is the place we go to find our connection to the whole of humanity and the universe.

  4. Paul Price says:

    Why are mountaintops often associated with religious experience?

    I have memories of when I hiked, camped and skied in the Rocky Mountains (“years ago”). In some ways, I have never felt “higher” above the earth than after I had hiked to a summit or the top of a pass-seemingly higher than in an airplane. Perhaps because I was gasping to offset the lesser oxygen, or I still retained some sense of body to ground (albeit very, very small to very, very large, though I saw it), which is evolutionarily attenuated in an airplane at 30,000 feet. At the edge of a cliff, or driving along a switchback going over a pass, with what seemed like a pretty flimsy guardrail between me, my car and a drop of maybe a couple of thousand feet, vertiginous, tightening of hands on the wheel, and fear. Mountains take lung emptying, leg weakening, “why am I doing this” effort to climb-at least in my experience. When I am aware of my vague definitions of “God” I feel analogous sensations and quail. This may be related to why many cultures have projected “Gods” onto mountains. Yet, the view is beautiful, awe arousing, and seen with my two little eyes.

    Both the Matthew and Exodus texts mention “clouds” that cover the mountains. Why do you suppose this is?

    Mystery, separation, otherness, obscuring, filtering of divine light, conceding an inability to describe, the impenetrable, but perhaps the cognitive mystery of seeing the mystery. “You will really only know God as described by the shifting, roiling vague contours of the clouds that surround God.”-sounds like a B-movie. I read Mircea Eliade a lot when I was younger (can’t remember much of it and I have now read he had some very regressive political associations in Romania), and how he thought many traditions wanted to communicate the perception/feeling of the wholly other quality of the divine-that stuck.

    What is one “mountaintop” experience you can relate from your own life?

    Sometimes when I can “see” a really good painting, I feel an intense, but quiet, existentially calming sense of “otherness,” yet joinder, which may seem to contradict what I have said before. I think of it as an otherness made a little more palpable because of the extraordinary human care and intelligence that went into it.

    Why do you suppose that Jesus’ disciples were afraid when they heard a voice saying that he was God’s son, and that God was pleased with him?

    If there were ever a crossing of the “wholly other” into my ear canal I might feel startled, probably afraid (again sort of b-movie quality, yet many traditions have well-considered thoughts on the subject). At the same time, I think “God’s” voice is heard in Jesus’s direction to forgive ‘seventy times seven times over’-or something like that-and I feel fearfully unable, but there it is.

    Does fear play any role in your spiritual/religious life?

    Yes, but it is not of hell, but of paying too little attention and not doing enough. Would I have had, do I have the guts or faith, as a christian, to help . . . . . and still pay the rent, my electricity bill, take a vacation . . .

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