Real Life Questions: Scripture for July 22

Luke 16:1-13
Then Jesus said to the disciples, “There was a rich man who had a manager, and charges were brought to him that this man was squandering his property.

So he summoned him and said to him, ‘What is this that I hear about you? Give me an account of your management, because you cannot be my manager any longer.’ Then the manager said to himself, ‘What will I do, now that my master is taking the position away from me? I am not strong enough to dig, and I am ashamed to beg. I have decided what to do so that, when I am dismissed as manager, people may welcome me into their homes.’

So, summoning his master’s debtors one by one, he asked the first, ‘How much do you owe my master?’ He answered, ‘A hundred jugs of olive oil.’ He said to him, ‘Take your bill, sit down quickly, and make it fifty.’ Then he asked another, ‘And how much do you owe?’ He replied, ‘A hundred containers of wheat.’ He said to him, ‘Take your bill and make it eighty.’

And his master commended the dishonest manager because he had acted shrewdly; for the children of this age are more shrewd in dealing with their own generation than are the children of light. And I tell you, make friends for yourselves by means of dishonest wealth so that when it is gone, they may welcome you into the eternal homes.

“Whoever is faithful in a very little is faithful also in much; and whoever is dishonest in a very little is dishonest also in much. If then you have not been faithful with the dishonest wealth, who will entrust to you the true riches? And if you have not been faithful with what belongs to another, who will give you what is your own? No slave can serve two masters; for a slave will either hate the one and love the other, or be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and wealth.”
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The scripture passage chosen for Sunday, July 22 is perhaps one of the most enigmatic of Jesus’ teachings. He seems to praise the dishonest accountant. Scholars offer a wide array of interpretations. What could Jesus be trying to convey in this strange passage? More broadly, how does the Bible help you in your everyday life and decision making, or does it?

Jeffrey Sartain
Executive Minister

 

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Plymouth Congregational Church is a progressive faith community grounded in the Christian tradition. We are spiritual, loving, relevant and transforming.
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One Response to Real Life Questions: Scripture for July 22

  1. Joan Smiley says:

    Real Life Questions: Scripture Luke 16:1-13 for July 22
    The scripture passage chosen for Sunday, July 22 is perhaps one of the most enigmatic of Jesus’ teachings.
    Then Jesus said to the disciples, “There was a rich man who had a manager, and charges were brought to him that this man was squandering his property………….

    Could the wisdom of this parable shed light on how we people of the developed world can discover the path to make the lifestyle changes an enact the national/international governmental policies necessary to address/alleviate the challenges that we (stewards of the resources around
    us) have imposed on the environment? A change of present honored priorities could equate to the redefined payment the manager in disgrace urged upon debtors of the rich man. Perhaps we could find a way to live a more family friendly, community oriented lifestyle based on values that are recognized as attainable and enriching for all.

    I think our society and many other societies in present day cultures have given technology and the gratifications supplied by the media an (fast foods mentality) too much acceptance as the enlightened way to live at this time.

    Jesus spoke in the era of a much simpler culture where agriculture and the products of the field were basic to life and provided a paradigm thatreferenced natures’ bounty as the way to be aware of God’s providence and care.

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